Promoting human rights & empowering grassroots activism in China

FacebookRSS FeedTwitter
[CHRB] China’s Draft National Security Law: More License To Abuse Human Rights (5/15-21/2015)

China’s draft National Security Law, which would pose a further threat to human rights if passed, underwent its second reading at the National People’s Congress in April (image: UPI/Stephen Shaver)

[CHRB] China’s Draft National Security Law: More License To Abuse Human Rights (5/15-21/2015)

The draft PRC National Security Law, if passed, would legalize the Chinese government’s systematic suppression of political, ethnic, and religious dissent and crack down on civil liberties. The draft includes a broad and ill-defined definition of “national security,” and provisions that would allow prosecution of dissenting views, religious beliefs, information online, and challenges to China’s “cyber sovereignty.” Alarmingly, it includes a list of “obligations” required of citizens and organizations, which if they failed to perform could result in their being held legally accountable. 
[CHRB] Forced Psychiatric Detention Persists 2 Years After China Enacted Mental Health Law (5/8-14/2015)

Guangdong activist Ma Shengfen (马胜芬) in November 2014, just before she was forcibly committed to a psychiatric hospital.

[CHRB] Forced Psychiatric Detention Persists 2 Years After China Enacted Mental Health Law (5/8-14/2015)

Forced psychiatric commitment is still widespread two years after China enacted its first Mental Health Law, according to reports by groups in the CHRD network that provide further evidence of the law’s lack of implementation. In particular, officials continue to punish individuals who challenge officials’ conduct or government policies, by detaining them against their will in psychiatric hospitals. Since the Mental Health Law (MHL) went into effect on May 1, 2013, reports indicate that those seeking redresses for grievances against officials are the majority of people involuntarily detained in such facilities, where some government critics have also been locked up.
China: Release Journalists, Protect Press Freedom

Some of the Chinese journalists in detention or prison today (clockwise from top left): Gao Yu (高瑜), Ilham Tohti (伊力哈木土赫提), Jiang Lijun (姜力均), Wang Hanfei (王寒非), Qi Chonghuai (齐崇淮), Zhang Miao (张淼), Hailaite Niyazi (海莱特尼亚孜), Chen Yongzhou (陈永州), and Dong Rubin (董如彬).

China: Release Journalists, Protect Press Freedom

On the eve of 2015’s World Press Freedom Day, CHRD calls on the Chinese government to release the dozens of journalists, bloggers, and citizen journalists imprisoned in China, including the recently imprisoned 71-year old journalist Gao Yu (高瑜). On April 17, a Beijing court sentenced Gao to seven years in prison for “illegally disseminating state secrets overseas” for allegedly sending a Chinese Communist Party directive to a US-based website. By the end of 2014, more journalists were in prison in China than in any other country, according to press freedom NGOs.
China Fails to Right A Wrong, Sentences Victim of Domestic Violence To Death a Second Time

Li Yan (李彦), victim of domestic violence, sentenced to death a second time.

China Fails to Right A Wrong, Sentences Victim of Domestic Violence To Death a Second Time

(The Network of Chinese Human Rights Defenders — April 24, 2015) Following a retrial of the death penalty case that was returned by the Supreme People’s Court, the Sichuan Provincial People’s High Court issued its verdict of death with a 2-year delay in execution to Li Yan (李彦), who had killed her husband after suffering repeated domestic violence. The announcement was made at Anyue County People’s Court on April 24, 2015. More than two years ago, hundreds of Chinese lawyers and activists urged China’s Supreme Court to halt the execution of Li Yan. The case was overturned by the court and received a second trial at the Sichuan High Court...
“Silencing the Messenger: 2014 Annual Report on the Situation of Human Rights Defenders in China”

“Silencing the Messenger: 2014 Annual Report on the Situation of Human Rights Defenders in China”

Human rights defenders in China experienced unusually severe reprisal in 2014, says CHRD in its annual report, Silencing the Messenger: 2014 Annual Report on the Situation of Human Rights Defenders in China. CHRD asserts that the government’s persecution of human rights defenders in 2014 was as severe as it has been since the mid-1990s. The government has launched relentless and aggressive assaults on fundamental liberties to tighten its stranglehold on the rapidly shrinking space for civil society, targeting HRDs, the messengers of human rights.
Individuals Detained in Mainland China for Supporting Hong Kong Pro-Democracy Protests

A number of individuals in the Mainland have been detained for supporting the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong.

Individuals Detained in Mainland China for Supporting Hong Kong Pro-Democracy Protests

A number of Chinese citizens have faced reprisals for supporting the Hong Kong protests for universal suffrage, which began in September 2014. The occupation of several areas in the territory, including parts of its financial and political center, has inspired many Chinese on the mainland. As of April 21, 2015, CHRD has documented 115 cases of detention in total, including 25 arrests (two have been released on bail), 33 criminal detentions (3 remain in custody), and 4 administrative detentions. Among these, 88 have been released.
Watch List of Detainees and Prisoners of Conscience in Need of Medical Attention

CHRD is concerned about the poor health of a number of Chinese prisoners, including Lü Jiaping (吕加平) and Zhu Yufu (朱虞夫).

Watch List of Detainees and Prisoners of Conscience in Need of Medical Attention

CHRD launched the Medical Watch List on June 26 to mark the UN’s International Day of Support of Victims of Torture. There are 21 cases of currently detained or imprisoned individuals who suffer from deteriorating health and have been deprived of adequate medical treatment and denied release on medical grounds. Some of them are experiencing the same pattern of abuse that led to the death of Cao Shunli—a lack of access to adequate medical treatment in custody, a gradual decline of health and development of new illnesses or injuries from torture, and rejection of requests for medical release. CHRD will be updating this list on a regular basis.
PRISONERS OF CONSCIENCE View List
Prisoner of Conscience – Wu Rongrong

Prisoner of Conscience – Wu Rongrong

Wu Rongrong  武嵘嵘 (released) Crime: “Creating a disturbance” Length of Punishment: N/A Court: N/A Trial Date: N/A Sentencing Date: N/A Dates of Detention/Arrest: March 7, 2015 (detained); April 13, 2015 (released on bail) Place of Incarceration: Haidian District Detention Center (Beijing Municipality) Background Hangzhou police detained Wu Rongrong (武嵘嵘) on March 7 and searched her...
Prisoner of Conscience – Li Maizi

Prisoner of Conscience – Li Maizi

Li Maizi  李麦子 (released) Crime: “Creating a disturbance” Length of Punishment: N/A Court: N/A Trial Date: N/A Sentencing Date: N/A Dates of Detention/Arrest: March 6, 2015 (detained); April 13, 2015 (released on bail) Place of Incarceration: Haidian District Detention Center (Beijing Municipality) Background Beijing police seized activist Li Maizi (李麦子, real name Li Tingting, 李婷婷)...
Prisoner of Conscience - Su Changlan

Prisoner of Conscience – Su Changlan

Guangzhou police seized housing and women's rights activist, Su Changlan (苏昌兰), after she expressed support for the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong that began in late September 2014. She was originally summoned for “creating a disturbance,” but police criminally detained her the next day on a more serious charge, “inciting subversion of state power.” Local...
Prisoner of Conscience – Xia Lin

Prisoner of Conscience – Xia Lin

Xia Lin 夏霖 Crime: Fraud Length of Punishment: N/A Court: N/A Trial Date: N/A Sentencing Date: N/A Dates of Detention/Arrest: November 8, 2014 (detained) Place of Incarceration: Beijing No. 1 Detention Center Background Defense lawyer Xia Lin (夏霖), a colleague of prominent human rights lawyer Pu Zhiqiang (浦志强) at Huayi Law Firm in Beijing, was summoned...

China’s military has declared war on Western thought on the internet

May 26, 2015 ⋅ Originally published by Quartz on May 21, 2015 China’s military says the internet has become its main ideological battlefield and that it should build a “Great Wall” online to protect the country’s citizens from “hostile Western forces.” A strongly worded editorial (link in Chinese) published in the People’s Liberation Army Daily on May said: “If we don’t occupy the internet, someone else...

Human rights groups attack China draft security law

May 26, 2015 ⋅ Originally published by The Financial Times on May 24, 2015 International human rights groups have slammed China’s new draft national security law for criminalising free speech and religious practices while granting the ruling Communist party sweeping powers to punish peaceful critics and dissenters. The vaguely worded draft law “includes a broad and ill-defined definition of ‘national security’,...

China charges prominent human rights lawyer as Xi tightens screw

May 18, 2015 ⋅ Originally published by The Christian Science Monitor on May 15, 2015 Pu Zhiqiang, who was arrested last year, faces charges of inciting hatred and provoking trouble that carry a lengthy prison sentence. He’s among nearly 2,000 political activists detained since President Xi took power in 2012. One of China’s best known and most outspoken human rights lawyers...