Promoting human rights & empowering grassroots activism in China

[CHRB] Forced Psychiatric Commitment of Dissidents Continues as Police Act Above Enacted Law (4/29-5/5, 2016)

Xu Dajin of Jiangxi and Wang Hedi of Jiangsu are among many “troublesome” citizens who Chinese officials have put into psychiatric institutions as political retaliation, three years after the adoption of China’s Mental Health Law.

[CHRB] Forced Psychiatric Commitment of Dissidents Continues as Police Act Above Enacted Law (4/29-5/5, 2016)

Forced commitment in psychiatric facilities remains a common form of retaliation and punishment by Chinese authorities against activists and government critics. The practice endures though it is apparently illegal, according to China’s first Mental Health Law, which was enacted three years ago, on May 1, 2013. Typically, government officials or police send petitioners, activists, or government critics to psychiatric hospitals, where victims face myriad violations of their legal and human rights. The three-year-old law clearly has been ineffective in halting politically-motivated forced commitment and mistreatment in psychiatric institutions.
Political Prisoner Yang Maodong's Health Deteriorating, Family Seek Urgent Action to Save His Life

The health of imprisoned activist Yang Maodong (杨茂东) has worsened to the point where his life may be in danger without prompt and proper medical treatment.

Political Prisoner Yang Maodong’s Health Deteriorating, Family Seek Urgent Action to Save His Life

The health of imprisoned activist Yang Maodong (杨茂东) has worsened to the point where his life may be in danger without prompt and proper medical treatment, according to his sister. Her alarming observations come less than a month after CHRD sent an update to UN human rights experts about Yang’s poor physical condition. His family are calling on Chinese authorities to release Yang, who has been imprisoned in violation of his rights to free expression and assembly, and allow him to access necessary medical treatment from a doctor of his own choosing.
China: Repeal Overseas NGO Law & Protect Freedom of Association

The new law governing foreign NGOs in China will place tight controls on their operations, and in turn continue to gut civil society groups in the mainland. (image: Flickr- Beijing Patrol: https://www.flickr.com/photos/securityguard/3679616585/)

China: Repeal Overseas NGO Law & Protect Freedom of Association

CHRD denounces the Chinese government’s adoption of a law governing overseas NGOs that will have a profoundly detrimental impact on China’s civil society. The law passed China’s rubber-stamp legislature on April 28 despite critical international responses to the most recent draft. The adopted version appears to retain the previous draft’s most troubling elements, particularly by giving police vast powers over how foreign-based groups can operate in China. Once the law takes effect, it will further obstruct the work of such NGOs and suffocate the country’s already beleaguered independent groups.
[CHRB] China Must Release 5 Activists on Trial: Cases Marred by Abuses (4/13-21/2016)

Five HRDs put on trial within one week (clockwise from bottom left): Yuan Xiaohua, Yuan Bing, Su Changlan, Liu Shaoming, and Chen Qitang.

[CHRB] China Must Release 5 Activists on Trial: Cases Marred by Abuses (4/13-21/2016)

Four detained human rights defenders have been tried since April 15, and a fifth is facing trial on April 22. All have spent lengthy periods of time in detention without seeing a judge, including two who have been held for almost three years. The activists—Liu Shaoming, Yuan Bing, Yuan Xiaohua, Su Changlan, and Chen Qitang—were seized after posting essays, messages, or photos of a “politically sensitive” nature online, or taking part in peaceful demonstrations. Their cases have been marred by abuses of due process rights that have become common in crackdowns under President Xi Jinping. CHRD asks for their unconditional release.
Individuals Affected by July 9 Crackdown on Rights Lawyers

Lawyers held in the police raid starting on July 9-10 include (clockwise from upper left): Bao Longjun (包龙军), Wang Yu (王宇), Zhou Shifeng (周世锋), Sui Muqing (隋牧青) Huang Liqun (黄力群), Wang Quanzhang (王全璋)

Individuals Affected by July 9 Crackdown on Rights Lawyers

Massive police operations targeting human right lawyers and coordinated by the Ministry of Public Security began on July 9 across China. The following is a list of detentions, including “residential surveillance” in unknown locations, disappearances (police custody in unknown location for more than 24 hours), and those released after summons for questioning or brief detention. The list will be constantly updated.
Watch List of Detainees and Prisoners of Conscience in Need of Medical Attention

Liu Ping (left) and Chen Xi (right) suffer from illness and have not received adequate medical care in prison.

Watch List of Detainees and Prisoners of Conscience in Need of Medical Attention

CHRD launched the Medical Watch List on June 26 to mark the UN’s International Day of Support of Victims of Torture. There are 15 cases of currently detained or imprisoned individuals who suffer from deteriorating health and have been deprived of adequate medical treatment and denied release on medical grounds. Some of them are experiencing the same pattern of abuse that led to the death of Cao Shunli—a lack of access to adequate medical treatment in custody, a gradual decline of health and development of new illnesses or injuries from torture, and rejection of requests for medical release. CHRD will be updating this list on a regular basis.
PRISONERS OF CONSCIENCE View List
Zhou Shifeng (周世锋)

Zhou Shifeng (周世锋)

Lawyer Zhou Shifeng, the director of Beijing Fengrui Law Firm, was detained in July 2015 during a nationwide crackdown on human rights lawyers that particularly targeted his firm. Police initially took Zhou into custody on July 10 at a hotel in Songzhuang, on the outskirts of Beijing, where Zhou had gone to welcome the release...
Xing Qingxian (幸清贤)

Xing Qingxian (幸清贤)

Chengdu-based activist Xing Qingxian disappeared on October 6, 2015, in Mong La, Myanmar, along with fellow activist Tang Zhishun (唐志顺) and Bao Zhuoxuan (包卓轩), the 16-year old son of detained lawyers Wang Yu (王宇) and Bao Longjun (包龙军).
Li Heping (李和平)

Li Heping (李和平)

Li Heping 李和平   Crime: Subversion of state power Length of Punishment: N/A Court: N/A Trial Date: N/A Sentencing Date: N/A Dates of Detention/Arrest: July 10, 2015 (disappeared); January 8, 2016 (arrested) Place of Incarceration: Tianjin No. 1 Detention Center   “The past ten years, I’ve struggled with him, argued and fought, and asked him not to...
Wang Yu (王宇)

Wang Yu (王宇)

Wang Yu 王宇 Crime: Subversion of state power Length of Punishment: N/A Court: N/A Trial Date: N/A Sentencing Date: N/A Dates of Detention/Arrest: July 9, 2015 (detained); January 8, 2016 (arrested) Place of Incarceration: Tianjin No. 1 Detention Center Background “She is a brave, forthright, selfless human rights lawyer. Most of the time she is on the...

China Passes Law Tightening Controls on Foreign Nonprofits

May 6, 2016 ⋅ Originally published by The Associated Press on April 28, 2016 BEIJING — China passed a law Thursday tightening controls over foreign non-governmental organizations by subjecting them to close police supervision, a move officials say will help the groups but critics charge is the latest attempt by authorities to clamp down on perceived threats to the ruling...

China Passes Law Bringing Foreign NGOs Under Police Control

May 6, 2016 ⋅ Originally published by Radio Free Asia on April 28, 2016 In a move  rights activists say is aimed at “strangling” the country’s embattled civil society, China’s parliament on Thursday approved a new law that will require overseas rights groups and other nongovernmental organizations to submit to police control. The standing committee of the National People’s Congress...

Meet China’s RoboCop: the robot police officer who doesn’t tire – or second-guess commands

May 5, 2016 ⋅ Originally published by South China Morning Post on May 5, 2016 China is developing a robotic security officer that can sniff out bombs, grab suspects with a mechanical clamp and deliver a jolt of electricity to neutralise threats. The military researchers behind the project say it will start patrolling public areas such as banks, airports and schools, although...